Teaching

COURSES DESIGNED and TAUGHT

At Arkansas State University

Modern British Literature (ENG 4283/5283)

This combined undergraduate and graduate course focuses on English literature in the twentieth century, along with selected background writings. The death of Queen Victoria in 1901 marked the end of Britain’s longest monarchical reign to that point, but it also signaled monumental changes for a world that had been shaped by British culture, trade, and imperialism. The ensuing century saw even greater transformation. In this course, students explore these changes via canonical (and not-so-canonical) literary texts from Modernist, Post-Modernist, and contemporary movements in Britain. In doing so, they will discuss various genres and examine how writers in the twentieth century and beyond have challenged established generic conventions and confronted the long history of British literature that preceded them. This course also emphasizes questions of gender, class, and race as essential factors for understanding modern British literature, and for relating it to important discussions in our current moment.

World Literature since 1660 (ENG 2013), Fall 2019

In this course, students analyze and contextualize literary texts written since 1660 by authors from many national and ethnic backgrounds. In doing so, they encounter a wide variety of genres—including essays, fiction, drama, and lyric poetry—and discuss how authors work within and beyond those genres’ conventions to help define literature over time. Students also explore major themes that resonate across different time periods in literary history. As they approach these issues, they practice the skills of close reading to better appreciate works of literature as cultural touchstones for their respective historical moments, as well as valuable insights into our world today.

At the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Writing in the Disciplines: Humanities (ENGL 105i), Spring 2019

What are the humanities? Who are humanists? What kinds of work do they do? This course explore such questions by situating students in the roles of humanities scholars in three fields, and by helping them practice their methodologies to compose, edit, and present scholarship in real-world genres. In this class, writing actively responds to rhetorical situations common to academic discourse communities in the humanities, and engages with public audiences through audio recordings, conference presentations, and blog posts. Students gain practice in composition techniques, participate in collaborative review sessions, and learn how to evaluate and improve their writing.

Scribbling Women: Or, Genre Fiction, Then and Now (ENGL 123), Fall 2018

In 1855, American author Nathaniel Hawthorne called the female novelists of his age “a damned mob of scribbling women.” They had cornered the popular fiction market, and he wasn’t happy about it. Nineteenth-century women garnered positive reviews and earned paychecks for fiction of many sorts, and it’s only through the process of canon formation that we’ve lost sight of their many contributions to the fictional forms of our present day. This version of “Introduction to Fiction” revisits the narratives of several popular fiction genres—bildungsroman, mystery, science fiction, and short story—to examine women’s impacts over time. We’ll pair an exemplary 19th-century text with one from 20th- or 21st-century American multi-ethnic literature to discover how Latina, Asian American, and African American women writers have drawn on these models to revamp and revitalize genre fiction.

Course Website available HERE.

First-Year Composition: Writing Across the Disciplines (ENGL 105), Spring 2017

In this course, students analyze the rhetorical and stylistic conventions that govern professional and academic writing in the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Students conduct research using a variety of academic databases and sources; understand how to use research as evidence in discipline-specific compositions using written, oral, and multi-media modes; review and revise their own work; and collaborate with others on group projects and peer review. This Spring 2017 iteration of ENGL 105 included a popular science article (natural sciences), a mock job or internship interview (business), and a collaborative digital edition of a 19th-century scrapbook (humanities) as the unit projects.

Introduction to Poetry (ENGL 125), Fall 2016

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Introduction to Poetry students examine manuscript poems by George Moses Horton in Wilson Library.

A freshman and sophomore elective, Introduction to Poetry is open to juniors and seniors, and designed for non-majors. It encourages understanding and appreciation of various poetic styles and generic forms by focusing on close readings of poems from all periods of English and American literature. Students learn the technical components of poetry and explore their uses in multiple genres, trace the evolutions of important genres and conventions across historic periods, become familiar with major poetic movements in English and American literature, and perform close readings and comparative studies through oral and written analyses.

Course Website available HERE.

First-Year Composition: Writing in the Disciplines (ENGL 105), Fall 2013-Spring 2016

In this course, students analyze the rhetorical and stylistic conventions that govern professional and academic writing in the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Students conduct research using a variety of academic databases and sources; understand how to use research as evidence in discipline-specific compositions using written, oral, and multi-media modes; review and revise their own work; and collaborate with others on group projects and peer review. Units taught include literature reviews and popular science articles (natural sciences), mock job and internship interviews (business), and literary analysis essays and poetry podcasts (humanities).

At Murray State University

First-Year Composition (ENG 105), Fall 2012-Spring 2013

ENG 105 is a seminar-style course emphasizing academic inquiry through critical reading and writing. The course goal is to facilitate academic inquiry and give students the tools to develop their writing as their university studies grow more complex. The course also familiarizes students with ways of thinking and interpreting texts so they can actively participate in disciplinary and interdisciplinary exploration through writing.

Basic Writing (ENG 100), Spring 2012

Designed to prepare students for success in First-Year Composition, Basic Writing cultivates critical reading skills and trains students in modes of writing typical of many college courses. Students work closely with instructors and teaching assistants to improve their writing and their confidence as writers. They also learn computer skills essential to multi-modal composition. In Spring 2012, this course included oral and written analysis assignments based on Marjane Satrapi’s graphic novel Persepolis (2000).

COURSES ASSISTED

At the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

19th-Century British Novel (ENGL 338), TA for Professor Laurie Langbauer, Fall 2015

In this course, students read important novels of nineteenth-century Britain, including novels widely popular at the time. These are novels filled with monsters, freaks, and outsiders. Why? In pondering that, students consider the form of the novel, nineteenth-century history and culture, as well as our own critical responses to the texts. How do our expectations govern how we read? How do our assumptions about what a novel should be reflect our sense of how the world should work? How do our current cultural interests determine our view of the nineteenth century?

At Murray State University

Basic Writing (ENG 100), TA for Professors Misty Evans and Nancy Phillips, Fall 2011

Designed to prepare students for success in First-Year Composition, Basic Writing cultivates critical reading skills and trains students in modes of writing typical of many college courses. Students work closely with instructors and teaching assistants to improve their writing and their confidence as writers. They also learn computer skills essential to multi-modal composition.

COURSES CONSULTED

See a description of UNC’s Graduate Research Consultant program HERE.

At the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Approaches to Drama: Regional Theater (ENGL 274), GRC for Laurie Langbauer, Fall 2018 and Fall 2016

Transnational Romanticism (CMPL 460), GRC for Janice Koelb, Spring 2017 and Spring 2015

Read my Spring 2015 blog post HERE.

Romanticism and Film (ENGL 143), GRC for Jeanne Moskal, Spring 2016

Nineteenth-Century Women Writers (ENGL 438), GRC for Jeanne Moskal, Spring 2014

Read my blog post HERE.